inside out head
funnynhilariousgif:

Slapping a bear »
killyourinspiration:

andibgoode:

britewings:

“Known as the Motorcycle Queen of Miami, Bessie Stringfield started riding when she was 16. She was the first African-American woman to travel cross-country solo, and she did it at age 19 in 1929, riding a 1928 Indian Scout. Bessie traveled through all of the lower 48 states during the ’30s and ’40s at a time when the country was rife with prejudice and hatred. She later rode in Europe, Brazil, and Haiti and during World War II she served as one of the few motorcycle despatch riders for the United States military.”
- http://demenshea.com

!!!

My hero!

killyourinspiration:

andibgoode:

britewings:

“Known as the Motorcycle Queen of Miami, Bessie Stringfield started riding when she was 16. She was the first African-American woman to travel cross-country solo, and she did it at age 19 in 1929, riding a 1928 Indian Scout. Bessie traveled through all of the lower 48 states during the ’30s and ’40s at a time when the country was rife with prejudice and hatred. She later rode in Europe, Brazil, and Haiti and during World War II she served as one of the few motorcycle despatch riders for the United States military.”

http://demenshea.com

!!!

My hero!

unexplained-events:

The Girl In Blue
In 1933, a girl dressed all in blue came to Willoughby, Ohio on a Greyhound bus. After spending the night at a boarding school and getting to meet everyone she decided to take a train to New York. Upon seeing the train, she dropped her luggage and sprinted for it. She was hit and killed by the train. No one knew her name or whether her death was an accident or a suicide.The only thing on her person was 90 cents and a ticket to Pennsylvania. 
Her identity remained a mystery until a title agency researched through some records and found her name — Josephine Klimczak. County records, however, have not changed the death certificate; she is still listed as The Girl in Blue.
The bottom of the grave reads “Unknown but not forgotten.”

unexplained-events:

The Girl In Blue

In 1933, a girl dressed all in blue came to Willoughby, Ohio on a Greyhound bus. After spending the night at a boarding school and getting to meet everyone she decided to take a train to New York. Upon seeing the train, she dropped her luggage and sprinted for it. She was hit and killed by the train. No one knew her name or whether her death was an accident or a suicide.The only thing on her person was 90 cents and a ticket to Pennsylvania. 

Her identity remained a mystery until a title agency researched through some records and found her name — Josephine Klimczak. County records, however, have not changed the death certificate; she is still listed as The Girl in Blue.

The bottom of the grave reads “Unknown but not forgotten.”

horrorfixxx:

Ghostwatch is a controversial British mockumentary broadcast only once by BBC 1 on Halloween Night 1992, depicting the fictional investigation of a haunted house by a team of journalists. Featuring actual BBC reporters, equipment, and on-screen graphics, the film was meticulously crafted to look like a real-life news special. This staunch realism caused many viewers to believe they were seeing actual paranormal activity, leading to an estimated 30,000 call-ins during the “live” broadcast and enough public outcry in the days that followed for the BBC to decide to ban the film outright. 
The film begins outside of an average-looking home where a mother and her two daughters are living in quiet fear of a supposed poltergeist. One of the daughters, curiously fixated on the entity, has dubbed it “Pipes” because of its tendency to rattle the house’s plumbing. The BBC team gets acquainted with the Early family, fast realizing just how terrified they are. As the investigation continues and the details of just what Pipes is and what it wants are slowly uncovered, the ghost begins to manifest itself around them. It looms in corners, outside of windows, and in reflections; a gruesome subliminal image, disappearing so quickly that neither reporter Sarah Greene nor her cameraman (nor anyone watching on TV) realizes what they’ve seen until they no longer see it. Some sightings are obvious, designed to instill fear both in the characters and in the audience. Others are there only for the truly observant, unnoticed by the cast, visible only for a few fleeting frames.
Intertwined with this staged investigation is an in-studio leg of the special hosted by veteran English broadcaster Michael Parkinson. He interviews several fictional experts on the paranormal and fields a number of scripted call-ins from “viewers” of the program. Mundane at first, the studio presentation starts to get stranger and stranger. The “callers” get more distressed, continuously claiming to have seen apparitions in the investigation feed. All the while, a graphic on the bottom of the screen keeps flashing a number for call-ins. This was intended as a way to let viewers know the film was a gag; phoning the number would redirect you to an automated message confirming just that. Due to the high volume of callers, however, most people got nothing but a busy signal that ultimately served only to further the ruse.
By the time Ghostwatch hits its climax — I won’t spoil it, no worries — much of its October ‘92 audience had suspended their disbelief and fallen under its spell. It’s an ending that, keeping in mind the context within which it lived that night, works like few ever have. It’s not that scary NOW, sure, but when it aired? It must’ve been disturbing. A finish specifically designed to engineer War Of The Worlds style mass hysteria a few short years before the internet would make such a thing impossible, it sparked a slew of complaints. Multiple cases of younger viewers suffering symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder were reported. One watcher, an 18-year-old factory worker known to suffer from learning disabilities, committed suicide just five days later. The plumbing in his family’s home began to creak, just as Pipes had made happen in the film, because of a problem with the central heating system. He left only a note reading “if there are ghosts I will be … with you always as a ghost”.
The BBC’s ten year ban on the film has expired, but they’ve never re-aired it.

horrorfixxx:

Ghostwatch is a controversial British mockumentary broadcast only once by BBC 1 on Halloween Night 1992, depicting the fictional investigation of a haunted house by a team of journalists. Featuring actual BBC reporters, equipment, and on-screen graphics, the film was meticulously crafted to look like a real-life news special. This staunch realism caused many viewers to believe they were seeing actual paranormal activity, leading to an estimated 30,000 call-ins during the “live” broadcast and enough public outcry in the days that followed for the BBC to decide to ban the film outright. 

The film begins outside of an average-looking home where a mother and her two daughters are living in quiet fear of a supposed poltergeist. One of the daughters, curiously fixated on the entity, has dubbed it “Pipes” because of its tendency to rattle the house’s plumbing. The BBC team gets acquainted with the Early family, fast realizing just how terrified they are. As the investigation continues and the details of just what Pipes is and what it wants are slowly uncovered, the ghost begins to manifest itself around them. It looms in corners, outside of windows, and in reflections; a gruesome subliminal image, disappearing so quickly that neither reporter Sarah Greene nor her cameraman (nor anyone watching on TV) realizes what they’ve seen until they no longer see it. Some sightings are obvious, designed to instill fear both in the characters and in the audience. Others are there only for the truly observant, unnoticed by the cast, visible only for a few fleeting frames.

Intertwined with this staged investigation is an in-studio leg of the special hosted by veteran English broadcaster Michael Parkinson. He interviews several fictional experts on the paranormal and fields a number of scripted call-ins from “viewers” of the program. Mundane at first, the studio presentation starts to get stranger and stranger. The “callers” get more distressed, continuously claiming to have seen apparitions in the investigation feed. All the while, a graphic on the bottom of the screen keeps flashing a number for call-ins. This was intended as a way to let viewers know the film was a gag; phoning the number would redirect you to an automated message confirming just that. Due to the high volume of callers, however, most people got nothing but a busy signal that ultimately served only to further the ruse.

By the time Ghostwatch hits its climax — I won’t spoil it, no worries — much of its October ‘92 audience had suspended their disbelief and fallen under its spell. It’s an ending that, keeping in mind the context within which it lived that night, works like few ever have. It’s not that scary NOW, sure, but when it aired? It must’ve been disturbing. A finish specifically designed to engineer War Of The Worlds style mass hysteria a few short years before the internet would make such a thing impossible, it sparked a slew of complaints. Multiple cases of younger viewers suffering symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder were reported. One watcher, an 18-year-old factory worker known to suffer from learning disabilities, committed suicide just five days later. The plumbing in his family’s home began to creak, just as Pipes had made happen in the film, because of a problem with the central heating system. He left only a note reading “if there are ghosts I will be … with you always as a ghost”.

The BBC’s ten year ban on the film has expired, but they’ve never re-aired it.

natgeofound:

A Native American sends smoke signals in Montana, June 1909.Photograph by Dr. Joseph K. Dixon, National Geographic Creative

natgeofound:

A Native American sends smoke signals in Montana, June 1909.Photograph by Dr. Joseph K. Dixon, National Geographic Creative

malformalady:

Timothy Clark Smith’s grave in New Haven’s Evergreen Cemetery. Smith was a 19th century doctor with an incurable fear, taphephobia — defined as an irrationally morbid fear of being buried alive. Fear of being buried alive was elaborated to the extent that those who could afford it would make all sorts of arrangements for the construction of a “safety coffin”, or other safety measures to put in place. Dr. Smith was buried in a specially prepared grave with his face positioned beneath a cement tube that leads to the surface. The 6ft tube ended at a piece of 14×14 inch plate glass allowing Tim to gaze upward towards the Vermont skies in the event that he was buried alive. For extra protection, a bell was supposedly placed in his hands that he could ring in case he woke up.
Photo credit  (top)Geoff Howard, (bottom)LINK

malformalady:

Timothy Clark Smith’s grave in New Haven’s Evergreen Cemetery. Smith was a 19th century doctor with an incurable fear, taphephobia — defined as an irrationally morbid fear of being buried alive. Fear of being buried alive was elaborated to the extent that those who could afford it would make all sorts of arrangements for the construction of a “safety coffin”, or other safety measures to put in place. Dr. Smith was buried in a specially prepared grave with his face positioned beneath a cement tube that leads to the surface. The 6ft tube ended at a piece of 14×14 inch plate glass allowing Tim to gaze upward towards the Vermont skies in the event that he was buried alive. For extra protection, a bell was supposedly placed in his hands that he could ring in case he woke up.

Photo credit  (top)Geoff Howard, (bottom)LINK

theenergyissue:

Fritz Kahn: Man as Machine and the Birth of Infographics

Fritz Kahn (1888–1968) was a German physician and prolific popular science writer known for pioneering infographics. He wrote on a range of topics, from the Milky Way to the atom, and often used startling metaphors, both verbal and visual, to make complex principles of nature and technology comprehensible to layman readers. In The Life of Man, an encyclopedic work of 1600 pages and 1200 illustrations, Kahn depicts biology as industrial and mechanical processes. Adopting avant-garde visual techniques and contemporary styles like Neue Sachlichkeit, Dada, Surrealism, and Constructivist photomontage, he draws comparisons between the energetic processes of the human body and those of automobiles, buildings, electric lights, furnaces, and more.

antipahtico:

Rick Berry

antipahtico:

Rick Berry